Ospreys In The Fog At Brigantine

These images were taken from a previous photo trip to the Brigantine Division of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in Oceanville, NJ. We stayed overnight to get an early start the next morning, but we woke up to a very foggy morning. We carefully drove from the motel to the Refuge anyway thinking maybe it would burn off at sunrise. But the fog stayed for a while and I kind of liked the eerie foggy look of the Refuge in the fog. Adding contrast and opening up the shadows helped with the very flat light with the flying Ospreys against the foggy white background sky. It sort of turned them into a high key white background. It was sort of interesting to be the only ones there in such a large foggy area. All images shot with a Canon 400mm Canon DO lens, some with a 1.4x teleconverter with a Canon 7D to get closer for flight images.
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Female Red-Winged Blackbird

These are images taken from a previous trip to the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, Brigantine Division in Oceanville, NJ. Along the Wildlife Drive you see many birds in the vegetation along the sides of the Wildlife Drive either foraging for a meal or just hanging out on vegetation & bushes. Most of the Drive has water on both sides of the Wildlife Drive which also provides a lot of photo opportunities. Also there are many Gulls overhead that have found clams on the shorelines. They fly above the Wildlife Drive & drop the clams on the road. Once they fall on the road and crack open, they fly off to eat their meal. I guess it easier to open then. We have not had any hit the car, but some came close. So there are many photo opportunities along the Wildlife Drive. On this day there were a lot of Red-winged Blackbirds along the Wildlife Drive. But you have a better chance to get nice images if you do not try to get too close since they will just fly off. I usually use a 400mm Canon DO lens with either a 1.4x or 2x teleconverter so we do not have to get too close.

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Vertical View of Red-winged Blackbird, 400mm DO lens with 1.4x teleconverter 

Sleeping Snow Geese

When I was photographing Snow Geese at the Brigantine Division of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, I concentrated on some very long panoramas with up to 35 images each. After I had photographed those, I also tried a few different shorter detail panoramas with only 3 to 9 images. The featured image is made with 3 horizontal images, assembled & blended in Photoshop.  I could have used a wider lens and cropped off the top and bottom, but I wanted to have more detail in the images of the individual Snow Geese.  For the image below, I wanted a little more height so I shot 9 vertical images for the panorama. These were shot with a Canon R with a 400mm D.O. lens with a 1.4x Teleconverter.

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9 vertical images, handheld panorama w/ 400mm & 1.4X teleconverter

 

 

Great Blue Herons At Brigantine

While I was photographing Landscapes & Cloudscapes along the Wildlife Drive at the Brigantine Division of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, I noticed this Great Blue Heron behind some of the grasses along the Wildlife Drive. I got a few shots through the grasses and then the two Herons lower down in the water flew off. I got a few more shots as they flew away from me. I was surprised that during the day we saw quite a few Great Blue Herons throughout the Refuge. Usually most do not hang around in the cold weather but there were quite a few throughout the Refuge.

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Canon R, 400mm f/4 DO lens, 1.4x series III teleconverter

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Sunset At Brigantine

A colorful sunset at the Brigantine Division of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in Oceanville, NJ. Image taken with a 24-105mm zoom @ 24mm along the Wildlife Drive.

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Closer view of sunset color in water & ice @ 105mm

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Closer Sunset Colors On Ice @ 400mm

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Colorful Ice & Water At Sunset – 400mm

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Bald Eagle on Snag with Red-winged Blackbirds in Background.

Mute Swan FlyBy

These were taken at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge a while ago. It was a foggy day and we were hoping it would burn off as the sun was getting higher. We saw this group of 4 swans coming towards us out of the heavy fog. They were close together and one behind was an Immature Mute Swan. They came very close and in a tight formation. I shot quite a few as they flew by, thinking they would not be great because of the fog and grayish look. But in Photoshop I brought up enough detail to be interesting.

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Osprey FlyBy

On our last visit to the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, Brigantine Division in Oceanville NJ, there were a lot of Ospreys.They were on Osprey Platforms, on posts, on trees, on the ground and busy fishing so it gave quite a few opportunities for photography. This male Osprey flew close by when I was photographing another one on the ground in the grasses.

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Brigantine Sunrise

Blue Dasher On Dried Cone Flower

Snow Geese Early Morning Take-Off

We went to the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in Oceanville, NJ, looking for Snow Geese. There are usually large numbers of Snow Geese at the Refuge in the cold months. We found thousands in large flocks around the refuge. The trouble is finding them close enough to photograph in a refuge this large. We generally did ok this trip, as the flocks were so large they covered a huge space that was viewable from the Wildlife Drive.

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