Making Panoramas With Fisheye Lenses

One of my favorite lenses for shooting images for panoramas is the 7 Artisans 7.5mm Fisheye lens for m43 cameras. It is supposed to have a 190 degree Field of View on a m43 camera but I believe it is a little less than that. But for shooting panoramas it really does not matter and is wide enough for my needs. But using a Fisheye lens for multi-image panoramas you have to de-fish the fisheye lens images before you blend the images for the final panorama. I do this in Photoshop using the Adaptive Wide Angle (Filter > Adaptive>Wide Angle.) All Images here were taken at the Brigantine Division of the Edwin B. Forsythe NWR in Oceanville NJ.

Image Taken with 7.5mm Fisheye Lens on an Olympus OMD-1D showing the “Fisheye” bowing look on horizon before Correcting Distortion with the Adaptive Wide Angle Filter
Screen Grab Showing Adaptive Wide Angle Filter Correction on Horizon line.

It might take a few tries before you get the “Feel” for using the Adaptive Wide Angle Filter for correcting the distortion in Fisheye lenses. Also it is pretty much setup for Full Frame Cameras so on m43 cameras (or any other format besides Full Frame you have to experiment on entering Focal length, etc. You would think Adobe would have a setting for Camera Format.

Screen Grab Showing my settings for Correcting Fisheye Look for my 7.5mm FE lens
One of the Fisheye Images Corrected for the series of images for my final Featured Image Panorama

Atlantic City Early AM Panorama

An early morning panorama of Atlantic City from the Wildlife Drive at the Brigantine Division of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in Oceanville NJ. This is a 3 image panorama shot with a 7.5mm Fisheye lens on an Olympus OMD-1. Before I could make the panorama I had to de-fish the Fisheye images in Photoshop using the Adaptive Wide Angle Feature under the “Filter” Selections along the top right selections. Once they were de-fished I loaded the 3 images into a layered Photoshop File and selected all 3 layers and used “Edit – Align Layers” for the 3 images, then once they were aligned I used “Edit Blend Layers” for the Final Panorama.

Center Section Of Panorama to Show Detail

Extreme Brigantine Snow Geese Panorama

On our trip to the Brigantine Division of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge I had a lot of opportunities to shoot a lot of Handheld Panoramas. One of my Panoramas was the most extreme panorama I have ever tried do. For the Featured Image I had to make it fit the 1200 pixel width which I exceeded x 4 times to try to hold some of the detail in the Featured Panorama. So I also cropped the full image down to 7 sections to show the detail below. Too bad it was a rather Gray day when I was photographing this group of Snow Geese because it brightened up a little later in the day. The Featured Full Panorama Image was 56 images for an image 525 inches long x ~30+ inches high @300 ppi. The Layered file was huge and the final Flattened file was 4 Gigs. I was shooting with a Canon R with a Tamron 150-600mm lens @ 483mm , f/16. Below are 7 cropped images to show the Detail in the above Featured image.

Sleeping Mute Swans At Brigantine

At the end of the Wildlife Drive at Brigantine there is a nice corner view of Doughey Creek. Sometimes you can see an Eagle off in the distance in the trees that are not visible from the other main Wildlife Drives. On this visit there were a couple of Mute Swans sleeping close to the Drive right before you exit the Drive or before you can go around for another visit on the Drive

Sleeping Mute Swan, Canon R @ 600mm, When it was closer to the bridge near the exit on our Round on Drive
Sleeping Mute Swans, 6 Image Panorama, Canon R @ 600mm
Sleeping Mute Swan (keeping an eye on me) Canon R @ 600mm
Mute Swans Sleeping, 5 Image Pano, Tamron 600mm, f/16, Canon R
Brigantine Wildlife Drive Map

Panoramas From Brigantine

A few days ago we went to the Brigantine Division of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in Oceanville, NJ to see what we could find to photograph. Usually there are large flocks of Snow Geese, Canada Geese & a variety of ducks throughout the Refuge this time of year. Most of the large groups of birds were fairly far out but that gave me the opportunity to do lots of hand-held panoramas. For cameras & lenses I was using a Canon R with a Tamron 150-600mm lens, a Panasonic LX1 pocket camera, an Olympus OM-D 1 with a 7.5mm Fisheye Lens and my iPhone 11 Pro. We also were able to get a few images of different Bald Eagles that were around the Refuge on this trip. On this post I have a few multi-image panoramas of flocks of birds around the Refuge with Atlantic City in the background. The Featured Image is a 29 image pano shot handheld with a 150-600mm lens @ 150mm on a Canon R. This was taken along the Wildlife Drive with the Atlantic City Skyline in the distance. The final image is 90 inches x 16 inches. Very Long Panoramas are not Great to post here because I have to downsize from 75-90 inches to 1200 pixels so I loose a lot of the detail in the images, but at least you can see the view I was trying to show! In future Posts I will be showing panoramas with flocks of birds & Brigantine Landscapes without Atlantic City in the background!

Cropped Main Image to Show Detail, 29 Image Panorama, Canon R, 150-600mm @ 150mm
Atlantic City from Wildlife Drive, 19 Image Panorama, 150-600mm @ 150mm, Canon R
Atlantic City View From Wildlife Drive, 3 Image Panorama, 6.3mm Lens (Full Frame Equiv. ~28mm), Panasonic LX1

Brigantine Cloudscapes & Landscapes

The cloudscapes were Great on our visit to the Brigantine Division of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in Oceanville New Jersey. For the Landscapes I was using 3 different setups depending on what I was trying to show in my images. For really wide views of clouds & landscapes I used an Olympus OMD-1 with a 7.5mm Fisheye lens (180 Degree FOV) or my iPhone 11 Pr0 with the 1.5mm (Full Frame Equivalent Field of view ~13mm) or the 4.3mm lens (Full Frame Equivalent ~26mm). I corrected the Fisheye lens Distortion of the 7.5mm Fisheye lens on the Olympus in Photoshop using the Adaptive Wide Angle Filter that is accessed under the main “Filter” listing on the top menu Pull Downs. For the far out or distant landscapes with flocks of birds I was using a Tamron 150-600mm lens on a Canon R (Some with a 2X Teleconverter giving me a 300mm to 1200mm).

The Featured Image is a 3 image panorama taken with a 7.5mm Fisheye Lens on an Olympus OMD Camera.

Brigantine Landscape Panorama, 8 images, iP11 using 6mm lens (Full Frame Equivalent FOV ~ 52mm)
Brigantine 4 image Panorama, iP11 Pro, 1.5mm lens (Full Frame Equivalent FOV ~ 13mm) Assembled in Photoshop
Early Morning Skyscape , iP11 Pro, 1.5mm lens, (Full Frame Equiv. FOV ~ 13mm) 3 Horizontal Images, Stacked Vertically, Pano Assembled in Photoshop
Brigantine Landscape, 3 Image Panorama, 7.5mm Fisheye Lens, OMD-1
Brigantine Landscape, iP11 Pro 1.5mm lens (Full Frame Equivalent ~13mm)
Brigantine Cloudscape, 7.5mm Fisheye, Olympus OM-D, De-Fisheyed in Photoshop
Brigantine Landscape Panorama, 6 images @ 150mm, Canon R, 150-600mm Tamron

BRIGANTINE IPHONE MULTI-IMAGE PANORAMAS

On our recent trip to the Brigantine Division of the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in Oceanville, NJ, I was traveling light. Mainly using a Tamron 150-600mm lens on a 1D mkIV, a 12-24mm zoom on a Canon R and my iPhone 11 Pro for multi-image landscapes & multi-image panoramas. The Canon R with the 12-24mm never made it out of the camera bag. I was having more fun shooting multi-image Panoramas on my iPhone 11 Pro. The featured image is 13 images shot in multiple images per row & then multiple rows with the iPhone 11 Pro & the 1.5mm lens.

Brigantine 5 Image panorama, iP11 Pro, 1.5mm lens (Full Frame Equivalent 13mm lens)
Brigantine 4 Image panorama, iP11 Pro, 1.5mm lens (Full Frame Equivalent 13mm lens)
3 Image Panorama, iP11 Pro, 1.5mm lens, Full Frame Equivalent 13mm)
Brigantine 8 Image Landscape, 1Phone 11 Pro, 1.5mm lens (Full Frame Equivalent 13mm)
Brigantine 14 Vertical image Landscape, iPhone 11 Pro, 1.5mm lens (Full Frame Equivalent 13mm)

Birds Of A Feather Not Flocking Together

While I was photographing the Snow Geese I noticed this group of birds in the foreground. I thought it was an interesting combination with the Canada Geese, a pair of Ducks and the lone Gull. The other 4 were asleep and it looked like the Gull was keeping watch over them.

Flying Brant Ducks with Atlantic City Skyline

As I was photographing clouds along the Wildlife Drive at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, Brigantine Division, this group of Brant Ducks took off. I thought it looked interesting as they flew over this little jetty of land in the water’s edge. Then they banked and flew farther to the right and over the Atlantic City Skyline you could see in the distance. The sky was constantly changing depending on which direction you were looking at. The cloud cover went from heavily overcast and ominous looking to blue sky with nice feathery clouds. But it did make for a wide variety of cloudscapes in one outing.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Olympus OMD-1, 14-140mm lens @ 48mm

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Clouds over brigantine

When we were at the Edwin B Forsyth NWR, Brigantine Division, we were looking for birds along the Wildlife Drive. But I liked the tranquil look of the soft clouds reflecting in the water. So I shot a series of shots combining them in Photoshop.

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