Focus Stacking RainDrop Images

After a rain it is fun to go out in the gardens to photograph raindrops. To get more Depth of Field (sharper focus across the image) and still have a smoother background, I use Focus Stacking techniques. I usually use f/8 or f/11, but it depends on how many images I want in my Focus Stack and how soft a background I want. The more wide open your f/stop, the more Focus Points you will need to add to the series of images. The Featured Image was 10 images taken with a 150mm Sigma macro lens @ f/8 on a Canon R. Images were loaded into 1 Layered Photoshop file and then let Photoshop align the 10 layers. (Edit-Auto Align Layers). After aligning the layers, choose Auto-Blend Layers to let Photoshop blend the sharpest sections from each layer into the final image. This Layer will be on the top of the layered Photoshop file. You will see the masked layers below the final showing the sharpest sections Photoshop masked and blended for the final layer on top. I usually save this layered file in case I need to go in and do a slight touch up here or there. Start with a 3 or 4 layered stack to help get the feel for doing this technique. Once you have done a few you will get the technique down and see what f/stops or how many layers work best for your imaging style. Also the amount of layers depends on how much of the image you want to be in sharp focus.

Raindrops – 8 image Focus Stack – @ f/2.8, Sigma 150mm macro, Canon R
Raindrops – 9 image Focus Stack, f/8. 150mm, Sigma 150mm, Canon R
Raindrops – 12 image Focus Stack, f/16
Raindrops – 12 image Focus Stack, f/8 for Smoother Background

8 Comments on “Focus Stacking RainDrop Images

  1. Your work is brilliant. I love the featured image the most. Your results are pin sharp.

    My Fuji X-T2 can focus bracket up to 999 frames, but I’m still having anxiety spending $1200 on the XF80mmF2.8 LM OIS WR macro lens.

    • Thanks so much Khurt! I really appreciate it! I manually shoot my focus brackets to get what I want. After you do a few you tend to get a “feel” for how many images to take for the focus stack you are working on. Plus the f/stop which is the best to use for your subjects. Also depends on how big your subjects are and the focal length of the lens you are using. Thanks Again!

    • Thanks so Much! They are fun to do! I am retired now and tend to use techniques for my personal work that I have used & perfected in my many years of Commercial work.

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